The Source

Michael Cordy
IT'S NOT A MYTH. IT EXISTS. FIND IT. Ambitious geologist Ross Kelly has it all: a lucrative career searching for oil across the world and a beautiful, brilliant wife, Lauren, pregnant with their first child. But when Lauren, a Yale academic, deciphers the university's mysterious Voynich manuscript, which has confounded experts for centuries, everything changes. An attempt to steal her translation of the Voynich leaves Lauren hovering on the brink of death, and Ross in the depths of despair. He seeks salvation in the ancient manuscript, which chronicles the discovery of a mythic, fabulous garden: an Eden so terrible and miraculous it rewrites the book of Genesis. The possibility of the garden's existence offers Ross the only hope of saving Lauren and their unborn child and so he decides to seek the garden out before it is too late. But he is not alone. Racing against time, a lethal assassin and a fanatical priest desperate to claim the miraculous garden for his church, Ross's quest will lead him to a place that will challenge everything he ever thought about the source of life on earth.

The Source is a journey back in time to the very creation of life on Earth. A hunt for the fabled Garden of Eden. The book follows Ross Kelly as he tries to find this mythical garden, hidden deep in the Amazonian forest in Peru. His motive? To find something that will save his wife and unborn children's life.

I love books of this kind, but some of them aren't well written or have such fanciful plotlines that you end up frustrated in reading them. As with all writing there's an art to writing them. They get dismissed as 'Dan Brown' rip offs by readers who sneer at the content. That's a real shame because there's lots to love in this genre. So which side of the divide did this book fall?

The Source is an unmitigated success. The storyline is tight and the tension and writing doesn't let up from the beginning. I always know when a book has my full attention when I spend more time devouring the facts than usual. Michael Cordy has written a plot that whilst might appear farfetched, you want to be true. You really want Ross to find this garden that's been hidden away before the inscrutable priest.

There's a lot of real world objects, like the Voynich Book, in the storyline that add and excite the reader. I personally really enjoyed this book. It's a cut above the usual books in the genre. It was a real joy to read.

Review by Brompton Sawdon
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Brompton Sawdon - Author

Brompton loves books and is always willing to give a viewpoint on books that have been exciting or disappointing.

From the top of a tower, somewhere in the Pennine Hills, Brompton views the world though world weary eyes. Occasionally ranting or raving over something that may seem irrelevant to you but matters to Brompton.

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