D - A Tale of two Worlds

Michel Faber
Dhikilo gazed through the doorway at the world beyond. This was her last opportunity to run back to safety. She thought about it. But only for a moment. An adventure was waiting for her. It all starts on the morning the letter D disappears from the language. First, it vanishes from her parents’ conversation at breakfast, then from the road signs outside, and from her school dinners. Soon the local dentist and the neighbour’s Dalmatian are missing, and even the Donkey Derby has been called off. Though she doesn’t know why, Dhikilo is summoned to the home of her old history teacher Professor Dodderfield and his faithful Labrador, Nelly Robinson. And this is where our story begins. Set between England and the wintery land of Liminus, a world enslaved by the monstrous Gamp and populated by fearsome, enchanting creatures, D (Tale of Two Worlds) is a mesmerising tale of friendship and bravery in an uncertain world. Told with simple beauty and warmth, its celebration of moral courage and freethinking is a powerful reminder of our human capacity for strength, hope and justice.

D - A Tale of Two Worlds is a book it's hard to pigeonhole. Is it a teenage/children's book or is it meant for adults? Well after reading this wonderful book I still can't make up my mind. Instead I'll say the both adults and young adults will enjoy this highly unusual story.

Dhilkilo is a thirteen year old girl from Somaliland now living in Kent. Her adoptive parents are typical middle class and Dhilkilo is happy. Her life is fairly straight forward. That is until the day she wakes up and finds all the D's in the world have disappeared. Yet she seems to be the only one who has noticed.

There are no more ogs, olphins swim in the seas. Arts in the pub are cancelled as they are mistaken for art. Her friends now call her Hilkilo and talk with all their missing D's. The death of a former teacher Professor Dodderfield (or oerfiel as he is now known) dies. This starts her on a quest to find where all the D's have gone and to a strange world.

This book is simply brilliant. It borrows from so many sources, yet manages to integrate them well into a unique story in its own right. There are the obvious Dickensian references. Yet there's a smattering of CS Lewis and others buried within the story line.

I highly recommend this book to everyone. It's a light hearted read, not demanding yet it manages to weave a great story together. There's a great friendship story, coupled with an epic quest. Another story that would be great read out loud to a rapturous audience.

Review by Brompton Sawdon
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Brompton Sawdon - Author

Brompton loves books and is always willing to give a viewpoint on books that have been exciting or disappointing.

From the top of a tower, somewhere in the Pennine Hills, Brompton views the world though world weary eyes. Occasionally ranting or raving over something that may seem irrelevant to you but matters to Brompton.

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